You are rightly confused by the spelling of the word "maiandros", which you have come across on other occasions as "meandros." Below is a brief account of the correct spelling of the word. However, as far as navigating to our site is concerned, you are on the safe side, no matter which spelling you choose, because both "maiandros.com" and "meandros.com" will bring you here (with or without the "www" in front)! We will also receive your e-mail message, regardless of whether it is addressed to "...@maiandros.com" or "...@meandros.com".

For the sake of accuracy, however, let it be said that the correct spelling of the word in Greek has always been "μαίανδρος" a spelling which agrees wonderfully with the etymology of the word: "μαία" and "ανήρ" the former meaning "midwife" and the latter "man", the union of which signifies the (symbolic) (re)birth of man into the victorious creature who can triumph over everything, so long as he treads the right path of self-knowledge. (The Greek language is "conceptual", more than any other, and this makes it relatively easy to trace the meaning of a word, when one knows the etymology.)1 The transliteration of the word which is used in many translations of ancient texts is "maeander". Yes, where did the -os ending go, and why should the dipthong "ai" be abused in this way, are legitimate questions; but let us not stop there and proceed to consider where the other spelling came from. It seems that because "maiandros" and "meandros" sound similar, someone who heard the word but not seen it in writing had transcribed in the Latin alphabet using the simpler "phonetic" form, which is "meandros". From English it spread everywhere in that spelling, to the point that even some Greeks, not knowing the correct spelling obviously, borrowed this spelling and turned it into Greek, resulting in a Greek word that is, strictly speaking, wrong!

(1) It is both interesting and entertaining to verify this by following some words which, in other languages may sound remote and unconnected to their meaning, but in Greek are not. Contact us for any further information you may require.